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How KLM destroyed the competition with a tweet

I assume you speak English, otherwise you'd find this web site fairly impenetrable. But if you did not, and you had to travel through countries where they don't speak your language, you'd probably appreciate help. And the organisations that seem keenest to give you that help are the ones you are going to trust.

In April this year, I wrote a blog here about how KLM won my business after I tried to find out who could help my mother-in-law make her way to Edinburgh from Moscow where there was no direct flight. London Heathrow closed due to Twitter described how the simple fact that an organisation decided they would use Twitter as an integral part of their business made all of their competition redundant.

And so this September, when it came to booking flights for her again, which airline do you think I went to? Yes, it was KLM, and they once again arranged for wheelchair assistance with a few simple, short tweets - for both her incoming and outgoing flights. The last message from them - "You are welcome, David! We hope she is doing fine. Have a great day."

Making people feel special and looked after is hard work. But it's a very worthwhile investment of your time and energy, because it means your customers like you, trust you, and come back again. And they share their experience with others, like I am doing right now. Add in the multiplier effect of social media, and your return on investment can be huge.

So. How are you using social media to make your customers feel special?